Choosing a Payment Option - Treasurer

(Please see https://adacounty.id.gov/treasurer for the latest version of this information)

A A A
Home > Treasurer > Tax Collection > Choosing a Payment Option

Choosing a Payment Option

PAYMENT OPTIONS:

  • In person:
    • Courthouse – 200 W. Front St., Mon. – Fri. from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
    • Public Administration Bldg. – 182 N. Cloverdale Rd., November 26 – December 20 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
  • By mail: P.O. Box 2868, Boise, ID 83701 (Please note USPS postmark must be indicated on or before the due dates; metered postage is not applicable).
  • Public Administration Bldg. 24/7 Dropbox: 182 N. Cloverdale Rd., November 26 – December 20.
  • Pay by Credit Card or E-Check: visit https://client.pointandpay.net/web/AdaCounty (Please note convenience fees will apply)
  • Pay by Integrated Voice Recognition: 1-844-471-7324 (Please note convenience fees will apply).

 

Late Payment Fees

A late charge equal to 2% of any unpaid portion of the first half of the tax is added at 5:00 p.m. on the due date. Interest accrues daily, at 1% per month, beginning January 1st of the year following the December 20th first half due date. When any portion of a manufactured home or personal property tax becomes delinquent, a Warrant of Distraint is issued to the County Sheriff for collection. Full payment of all tax, late charge, warrant fees, and interest is required to release the warrant.

Taxpayers often have difficulty understanding why, if they pay their second-half taxes only a few days after the June 20th due date, they must pay six months of interest on the delinquent second half. Under Idaho Code, the full year taxes are DUE on December 20th. To ease the burden of payment of the taxes in a lump sum, the law gives the taxpayer the option of paying one-half of the tax amount on or before December 20th and deferring payment (an extension) of the second half taxes until June 20th of the following year without any late charge or interest. If, however, the payment is not received (or postmarked) by June 20th, the late charge and interest are added as if the tax became delinquent after the original December 20th due date.

Partial Tax Payments

We can accept partial payments of any amount at any time on delinquent taxes. Interest will continue to accrue on the unpaid, delinquent balance at the rate of 1% per month.

Partial prepayments of at least $25 can be applied toward current year or future taxes on both real and personal property, as long as a delinquency does not exist. A billing will be mailed for any remaining balance which may be paid according to the standard schedules and regulations for property tax collection.

Once any part of a personal property tax becomes delinquent, the unpaid portion of the entire tax shall immediately become due and payable.

Late Payment Fees

A late charge equal to 2% of any unpaid portion of the first half of the tax is added at 5:00 p.m. on the due date. Interest accrues daily, at 1% per month, beginning January 1st of the year following the December 20th first half due date. When any portion of a manufactured home or personal property tax becomes delinquent, a Warrant of Distraint is issued to the County Sheriff for collection. Full payment of all tax, late charge, warrant fees, and interest is required to release the warrant.

Taxpayers often have difficulty understanding why, if they pay their second-half taxes only a few days after the June 20th due date, they must pay six months of interest on the delinquent second half. Under Idaho Code, the full year taxes are DUE on December 20th. To ease the burden of payment of the taxes in a lump sum, the law gives the taxpayer the option of paying one-half of the tax amount on or before December 20th and deferring payment (an extension) of the second half taxes until June 20th of the following year without any late charge or interest. If, however, the payment is not received (or postmarked) by June 20th, the late charge and interest are added as if the tax became delinquent after the original December 20th due date.

* * * IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING ACH CHECK CONVERSION * * *

In an effort to reduce time, resources and costs required to process payments, checks received by the Ada County Treasurer’s Office may be converted to ACH debits. When you provide a check as payment, you authorize us either to use information from your check to make a one-time electronic fund transfer from your account or to process the payment as a check transaction. When we use information from your check to make an electronic fund transfer, funds may be withdrawn from your account as soon as the same day you make your payment, and you will not receive your check back from your financial institution. For further information visit electronicpayments.nacha.org/

FAQ Regarding ACH Check Conversion

What happens when my check is converted to an electronic transaction?

The bank uses the information on the check and “converts” the check to an electronic transaction based on that information. Electronic transactions are more efficiently processed than paper checks, and that helps keep costs lower.

Why isn’t the check listed on my bank statement?

Since your payment is processed as an electronic transaction, it may be listed in the section of your bank statement with other electronic debits. The description of the electronic debit includes information to help you easily identify your payment. Bank statements typically include only the serial number, paid date and amount for checks. Since converted items are electronic debits, you may be able to see the payee and a transaction description in your statement.

May I get my original check back?

No. For your protection, the original check is destroyed to ensure that the original check is presented for payment only once through an ACH debit.

Does this mean you debit my account each month and I don’t have to write a check to pay my bill?

No. This is not a recurring debit program. The bank needs your check to initiate each payment. You still control the timing of a payment by paying with a check.

What authority allows the bank to convert my check?

Pursuant to regulatory rules (NACHA and Regulation E).  Ada County posts a notice at the point of sale.

May I place a stop payment on a converted check?

Yes. As with any stop payment, however, you should place the stop order with your financial institution as soon as possible after issuance, as checks may clear quickly.